Category Archives: Links

The Celestia Project: Vision for the Future

By Annette Osso, Managing Director, Resilient Virginia

The Celestia Project

Earth Day 2015 is just around the corner, and this year Resilient Virginia would like to share with our readers an inspirational vision of the future. This comes through our exclusive sneak peak of the ebook on The Celestia Project, which will be unveiled officially by Green Builder magazine on this Earth Day. Over the past year, chapters of The Celestia Project were featured in issues of the magazine.

The Celestia Project, created by Matthew Power, Editor-In-Chief of Green Builder magazine, presents a time capsule from the year 2100. The interactive publication takes on such topics as food security, low impact transportation, successful urban living, energy use and decarbonization, fresh water abundance, and resilience in buildings and communities.

Matthew Power provides this perspective:

“This project is really the culmination of a lifetime of writing, researching and advocating for more sustainable homes and lifestyles. It took a year to write, but many years to gather and process the ideas. It came about as a response to the prevailing dystopian views that pervade our culture. The Celestia Project argues that we don’t have to starve to death, wallowing in our own rubbish, chased by our runaway robots. Instead, we can do what needs to be done to save ourselves: wrestle with human nature, harness our technology, and build a better, greener world.”

You can view the entire interactive ebook here.

About Green Builder magazine

This magazine is oriented toward residential building professionals, but also has excellent annual “Homeowner’s Handbook” and “Sustainable Landscaping Guide” issues which make it interesting reading for anyone interested in low impact living. Go to www.greenbuildermedia.com/magazine-home-page for more information.

Georgetown Climate Center

logo-georgetown_climate_centerThe nonpartisan Georgetown Climate Center seeks to advance effective climate, energy, and transportation policies in the United States—policies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions and help communities adapt to climate change.

Led by Executive Director Vicki Arroyo and Faculty Director Professor Peter Byrne of Georgetown Law, the Center also seeks to ensure that national climate and energy policy is informed by lessons from existing state efforts and that national policies maintain an ongoing role for state innovation and implementation.

The Center performs a vital role in the development of policy by:

  • Connecting states and federal policymakers;
  • Analyzing legislative and regulatory developments and assisting with program design;
  • Sharing best practices and success stories with state and federal policymakers;
  • Serving as a resource to all states in addressing climate change and promoting a clean energy economy.

Based at Georgetown Law, the Center works extensively with government officials, academics, and an array of stakeholders to strengthen state and federal climate partnerships. The Center analyzes the provisions of federal policy relevant to states and territories, and encourages policymakers to learn from and adopt innovative policies emerging from the states.

Visit the Georgetown Climate Center website for tools, reports, and more.

 

The Mitigation and Adaptation Research Institute (MARI)

logo-MARIClimate change and sea-level rise pose unprecedented threats to communities across the world, especially the heavily-populated urban coasts. There is increasing evidence that the changes anticipated for the 21st Century will push the climate outside the range known to civilization and into a phase of much greater variability. This will challenge decision-making in all societal sectors, and it will require a new level of preparedness to mitigate the impacts and adapt to the changes.

The Mitigation and Adaptation Research Institute (MARI) at Old Dominion University engages in research that produces the practice-relevant knowledge needed to address the challenge of climate change and sea level rise for the coastal zone. In doing so, MARI responds to the knowledge needs of a wide range of community stakeholders, including government, military, private sector, and private citizens. The investment that Old Dominion University has already committed in the form of the interdisciplinary CCSLR Initiative has paid dividends, with many local and non-local stakeholders already actively engaged and faculty from across ODU’s departments and colleges in an active, collaborative attempt to begin to seek solutions to the problems we face.

MARI facilitates and engages in research, education and outreach to promote and enhance the understanding of climate change and sea level rise and their multi-faceted impacts on the built environment and the social fabric of coastal cities. MARI works with societal stakeholders to develop options to mitigate and adapt to these impacts and support these stakeholders in the application of the knowledge resulting from the research.

Visit the MARI web workspace at www.odu.edu/mari.

Rebuild by Design

Rebuild by Design was conceived as a HUD competition to respond to Superstorm Sandy’s devastation in the United States’ northeast region. Initiated by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development and the Presidential Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force, Rebuild by Design connects the world’s most talented researchers and designers with the Sandy-affected area’s active businesses, policymakers and local groups to better understand how to redevelop their communities in environmentally and economically healthier ways and to be better prepared.

Visit the Rebuild by Design website at www.rebuildbydesign.org.

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