Category Archives: Publications

Costs of Doing Nothing: Economic Consequences of Not Adapting to Sea Level Rise in the Hampton Roads Region

Costs of Doing NothingRecent studies have pointed out the economic costs of rising temperatures, increased sea levels, and extreme weather events — all factors associated with climate change impact in the Southeast United States.

Costs of Doing Nothing: Economic Consequences of Not Adapting to Sea Level Rise in the Hampton Roads Region, a 2016 report from Virginia Coastal Policy Center, College of William & Mary Law School, narrows down the data to the Hampton Roads area. This report looks at several scenarios for sea level rise and the economic consequences.

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Climate Change in the American Mind: November 2016

Climate Change in the American Mind: November 2016Yale Program on Climate Change Communication, George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication

In the wake of a contentious U.S. election and despite the election of a president who has publicly described global warming as a hoax, Americans are increasingly sure global warming is happening, according to this national survey conducted after the presidential election (November–December 2016). The report includes many other interesting results, including measures of public feelings of anger, fear, and hope about global warming and the frames by which Americans conceptualize the issue (e.g., as an environmental, scientific, political, moral, or religious issue).

View the report here.

Hampton Roads Sea Level Rise Preparedness and Resilience Intergovernmental Pilot Project

The mission of the Intergovernmental Planning Pilot Project, from Old Dominion University’s Center for Sea Level Rise, is to develop a regional “whole of government” and “whole of community” approach to sea level rise preparedness and resilience planning in Hampton Roads that also can be used as a template for other regions. View the Pilot Project Charter for an in-depth look at the Pilot Project’s intentions.

“Phase 2 Report: Recommendations, Accomplishments and Lessons Learned” was published in October 2016, and can be viewed here.

Find out more about the Center for Sea Level Rise’s continuing activities at www.centerforsealevelrise.org.

Climate Ready DC: The District of Columbia’s Plan to Adapt to a Changing Climate

climate-ready-dcfrom the Climate Ready DC draft report

Cities across the country and around the globe are recognizing their responsibility to prepare for a changing climate, and the District of Columbia is no exception. In recent years, we have seen how climate change is already impacting us with recordbreaking heat waves, flooding caused by rising sea levels and heavy rains, and the destructive 2012 derecho storm. These events are sobering reminders that without action, increasingly severe weather events will threaten to disrupt our power grid, harm our economy, and cost lives.

Recognizing the need to prepare and adapt, the Sustainable DC Plan established a goal to make the District more resilient to future climate change. Climate Ready DC is the District’s strategy for achieving this goal while helping to ensure that our city continues to grow greener, healthier, and more livable.

Purpose

For the last two years, various stakeholders and the District government—led by the Department of Energy and Environment (DOEE)—have been working with a team of technical experts to develop Climate Ready DC. This plan identifies the impacts that a changing climate will have on the District; the risks to our infrastructure, public facilities, and neighborhoods; and the actions we must take now and in the future to prepare. It is based on the best available climate science and was developed through consultation with leading experts within and outside of the District government.

View the draft Climate Ready DC online.

Resilient Cities, A Grosvenor Research Report

Screen Shot 2016-08-03 at 1.31.00 PMA 2014 research report developed by Grosvenor quantified the resilience of the world’s most important 50 cities based on two criteria: vulnerability and adaptive capability. The Resilient Cities Report collected independent data and created a scale on which to place each of the 50 cities. The results  Canadian cities in the top three, with U.S. cities following. A notable conclusion can also be made from the highest forecast population growth occurring in the least resilient cities from the list.

Climate Change Indicators in the United States

climate-change-indicators-in-us-2016This 2016 report from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) shows compelling and clear evidence of long-term changes to our climate and highlights impacts on human health and the environment in the United States and around the world.

The report features observed trend data on 37 climate indicators, including U.S and global temperatures, ocean acidity, sea level, river flooding, droughts and wildfires.

Click here to view the report online, or visit the EPA website to explore the indicators for climate change.

Climate Change: Cost of Inaction for Maryland’s Economy

Screen Shot 2016-08-03 at 10.59.24 AMThe Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) produced a report in November 2015 that expanded upon climate impacts addressed in the American Climate Prospectus. The report includes estimates on climate change’s effects on infrastructure, tourism, ecosystems, agriculture, water resources, and human health. Furthermore, the report speaks on the costs of inaction. The report concludes that risks and costs grow with increasing severity of climate change impacts and can be significantly reduced via immediate mitigation actions.

 

Risky Business: A Climate Risk Assessment For the United States

Screen Shot 2016-08-02 at 3.29.06 PMIn this climate risk assessment published in June 2014, co-chairs Michael Bloomberg, Henry Paulson Jr. and Thomas Steyer present the details and economic costs of inaction in the face of climate change. The Risky Business report cites the short-term climate threats presented in the U.S. and the specific economic risks they pose to differing regions and sectors. In the report, climate change is likened to “Nature’s Interest-Only Loan” in order to express the economic impact the changing global environment will have in the future. Bloomberg, Paulson and Steyer conclude the risk assessment report with risk management steps to be taken in order to reduce exposure to the economic risks from climate change.

Climate Change Adaptation for Agriculture: Mitigating Short- and Long-Term Impacts of Climate on Crop Production

Screen Shot 2016-08-01 at 3.54.10 PMThe Virginia Polytechnic Institute and Virginia State University produced this publication in 2014 outlining climate-related challenges facing agriculture and some options for mitigating and adapting to them. Included in the publication are adaptation strategies and conservation techniques touching on soil water-holding capacity, tillage, crop rotations, drainage, irrigation, nitrogen use, and buffers. The online PDF version of the publication is available through the Virginia Cooperative Extension.

Colorado Resiliency Framework 2016 Annual Plan

Screen Shot 2016-08-01 at 3.01.14 PMThe Colorado Resiliency Framework 2016 Annual Plan is an extension of the Colorado Resiliency Framework that was adopted in 2015. This plan details how the Colorado Resiliency Working Group will achieve the goals laid out in the framework, mainly via resiliency-focused projects in the community, economic, health and social, housing, infrastructure, watershed and natural resources sectors.

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