Author Archives: ResilientVirginia

Sea Level Rise Preparedness: An Intergovernmental Pilot Project as a Blueprint for Community Resiliency

by Rear Admiral Ann C. Phillips, US Navy (Retired)

Storm surge map courtesy of chesapeakeclimate.org

Storm surge map courtesy of chesapeakeclimate.org

The Hampton Roads Sea Level Rise Preparedness and Resilience Intergovernmental Pilot Project (IPP) (convened by Old Dominion University and launched in June 2014) was one of four National Security Council pilots and three Department of Defense pilots established to prepare the United States for the impacts of a changing climate.

Hampton Roads localities (including Norfolk, Hampton, Newport News, Portsmouth, and Virginia Beach), four Cabinet Departments of Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe, 11 Federal Agencies (including DOD, Army, Navy, and Air Force), DHS (U.S. Coast Guard), DOT, DOE, Port of Virginia, VDOT, HRPDC, HRTPO, HRSD, and a variety of private businesses and non-profits worked together over two years to develop recommendations and strategies for cooperative resilience planning. Throughout the process, more than 200 regional professionals participated in voluntary working groups, committees, and stakeholder events.

Sea Level Rise Preparedness: An Intergovernmental Pilot Project as a Blueprint for Community Resiliency

Norfolk Naval Station, Hurricane ISABEL 2003. US Navy file photo.

The IPP’s stated mission was that upon completion of the two year effort, Hampton Roads would have a path to establish a regional Whole of Government and Whole of Community organizational framework, along with recommended procedures to effectively coordinate sea level rise preparedness and resilience planning for the region. Further, the IPP’s vision and the National Security Council’s objective included the development of this regional framework for Hampton Roads as a template that could be used for other regions.

Best Practices: The IPP validated a number of successful practices that could transfer to any region addressing similar challenges.

  1. First and foremost — it started with an established Charter, Mission, and Vision statement. This helped guide committees and working groups throughout the process, and allowed them to continue their work at an independent pace.
  2. The IPP was fortunate to solicit whole of government and community involvement early in the process, including participation at the federal, state, and local level. This attribute was hailed as one of the key discriminators in overall value to participants, and to the success of the outcome.
  3. The use of a university as the convening authority also added merit to the process, serving as a trusted agent, facilitating work in a non-partisan environment, and with the ability to match and support research and curriculum with the project’s efforts and outcomes.
  4. The initial construction of the charter included proposed working group and committee membership, by organization or agency, expertise, and in some cases, by name. This created a much simpler path to establishing group membership for working group and committee chairs, and also added an additional level of focus and understanding of the anticipated level of experience.
  5. The IPP also established, as a part of its recommendations, a process to consider future outcomes and to recommend additional work — including studies, pilots, test projects, and suggested funding sources.
  6. The task of identifying funding sources to support the IPP’s activities proved the most challenging aspect of the effort from the start, and was called out as an item for resolution as early as possible in any similar process.
Sea Level Rise Preparedness: An Intergovernmental Pilot Project as a Blueprint for Community Resiliency

Photo Courtesy of Dr Larry Atkinson, ODU. Larchmont Neighborhood, Norfolk, VA. 2016

Desired Outcomes: The Pilot Project identified five key desired outcomes to help Hampton Roads move forward in adapting to this challenge, shown here as synthesized from case studies and findings across the committees and working groups, and including lessons learned from South Florida, New Orleans, and the Netherlands. They are as follows:

  • Develop and implement common Regional Planning Standards — including, but not limited to common first floor elevation/building codes/GIS attributes/sea level planning scenarios — to facilitate effective regional planning and execution of adaptation efforts.
  • Establish support from a Consortium of Universities — ensure the best possible science, data, and engineering expertise from a non-partisan trusted agent.
  • Establish a Regional Data Center — ensure an independent, centralized ability to collect, analyze, distribute, and respond to regional data needs.
  • Ensure collaborative, prioritized planning and execution — create formalized relationships between Federal/State/Cities/Municipalities/ Businesses/Non-profits and Citizens
  • Identify funding strategies and create funding instruments for regional program needs — bring together and prioritize opportunities from multiple sources including federal, state, local government, private industry, and non-profits.

Sea Level Rise Preparedness: An Intergovernmental Pilot Project as a Blueprint for Community ResiliencyNext Steps: The Pilot Project identified the establishment of a regional planning and execution entity as a key factor to enable whole of government and community adaption efforts. Designation as a “special service district authority” or “the joint exercise of local government powers by agreement” would allow this regional entity to identify, facilitate, and prioritize those adaptation efforts based on identified regional needs that collaborative oversight and funding. As a recommended first series of actions, this entity could undertake a regional identification and evaluation of critical (as defined by the region) public and private infrastructure that are vulnerable to sea level rise. It could then prioritize impacted infrastructure needs, and evaluate region-wide dependencies and interdependencies of that infrastructure. Once regional vulnerabilities are understood, the next consideration could be to conduct a regional watershed vulnerability study and from that, develop a regional urban water plan.

Ongoing Work: While this regional planning and execution entity has yet to be created, there are tremendous ongoing individual efforts by cities and municipalities, including, but not limited to:

  • Norfolk’s Vision 2100 Plan,
  • Coastal Storm Risk Management Study (with USACE),
  • National Disaster Resilience Competition Grant award for the ongoing Ohio Creek Watershed Transformation,
  • Virginia Beach’s ongoing Comprehensive Sea Level Rise and Recurrent Flooding Analysis and Planning Study, and
  • Hampton’s ongoing Coastal Resilience and Urban Water Planning efforts.

Hampton Roads Sea Level Rise Preparedness and Resilience Intergovernmental Pilot ProjectMore broadly across the region, the Hampton Roads Planning District Commission hosts a Coastal Resiliency Policy Advisory Committee and Working Group, and is overseeing Joint Land Use Studies evaluating Norfolk/Virginia Beach 2017–2018, with a Chesapeake-Portsmouth study planned to start later in 2018. These studies, funded by the Department of Defense Office of Economic Adjustment, will evaluate sea level and recurrent flooding impact on federal military infrastructure, and make recommendations for adaptation measures.

Other ongoing activities:

  • The Commonwealth Center for Recurrent Flooding Resiliency (CCRFR), established in 2016, partners Old Dominion University (ODU) with William and Mary’s Virginia Coastal Policy Center and Virginia Institute of Marine Science to address statewide recurrent flooding challenges.
  • ODU sponsors the Resilience Collaborative, a professorial consortium of subject matter experts, collaborating on sea level and climate impact research.
  • Further, RISE Coastal Resilience Laboratory, established through the NDRC grant competition award, is focused on creating incentives for strategic regional resilience through accelerating innovation related to adaptation measures.

Finally, there are two ongoing studies that evolved from the IPP:

  • The Department of Transportation working with Virginia Maritime Association, Port of Virginia, HRPDC, and ODU on a regional transportation Economic Impact Quantification Study, and
  • Members of the Resiliency Collaborative, NDRC Grant Project Team, and the IPP teamed on a Cross Municipality Watershed Study with the cities of Chesapeake and Portsmouth.

While there are actions and activities underway across the region at every level, the need for the regional collaboration and oversight entity identified by the IPP grows as water levels continue to rise and the land subsides. The IPP showed the tremendous value of regional partnerships working in collaboration across the whole of government and community. Now, it is up to Hampton Roads to seize this opportunity to take the lead in developing collaborative adaptation and mitigation strategies and actions to address to this existential threat — and we have no time to lose!

To view the IPP final report and case studies on line, go to: ODU Digital Commons

About the author: Rear Admiral Ann C. Phillips, US Navy (Retired) chaired the Infrastructure Working Group for the Hampton Roads Intergovernmental Pilot Project from 2014–2016. She is now a member of the Advisory Board for the Center for Climate and Security. The opinions expressed are her own.

Hampton Roads Sea Level Rise Preparedness and Resilience Intergovernmental Pilot Project

Hampton Roads Sea Level Rise Preparedness and Resilience Intergovernmental Pilot ProjectAfter two years, the Hampton Roads Sea level Rise and Resilience Intergovernmental Planning Pilot Project (Intergovernmental Pilot Project or IPP), convened at Old Dominion University, has come to a successful close. Although the conclusion of the project is different than originally imagined by the drafters of the IPP Charter, the process in and of itself brought hundreds of stakeholders together, built lasting and ongoing relationships, and produced many workable recommendations for the region that can be accomplished by a variety of partnerships. The key deliverables include a whole of government mitigation and adaptation planning process and an integrated regional recommendation, both which can serve as a template for other regions. Additionally the IPP demonstrated a new role for an urban campus to act as a community convener, matching focused research and curriculum development with public service across the university and the region.

Initiated in June 2014, the IPP was an effort to use the knowledge, skills and expertise of all regional stakeholders to create a framework or template for intergovernmental strategic planning that could be used outside the region; and, to implement that integrated strategy in Hampton Roads, Virginia, creating an effective and efficient method for planning holistically for sea level rise and recurrent flooding. This “Whole of Government and Community” effort would not have been successful without the hundreds of stakeholders and volunteer leaders from across all levels of government, academia, and the community who participated out of a sense of duty to their community and commitment to the collaboration.

Knowing water knows no jurisdictional bounds, a high level of intergovernmental collaboration is necessary to develop integrated regional solutions and implement effective sea level rise preparedness and resilience strategies. Additionally, the wider community in Hampton Roads recognizes that they too will be affected by not only sea level rise itself, but also the adaptation strategies implemented in preparation. Executive Summary Phase 2 Report: Recommendations, Accomplishments and Lessons Learned Executive Summary 11 Phase 1 of the project, from June 2014 through June 2015, saw the drafting and signing of a Charter, the recruitment of a steering committee, a host of events, and the development of working group and advisory committees comprised of subject matter experts. Phase 2, from June 2015 through June 2016, included heavy discussion with regard to ongoing strategies for intergovernmental collaboration as well as research, a number of case studies carried out by committees and working groups, and the careful development of recommendations for the region.

The IPP concludes successfully with a series of recommendations from each working group and committee as well as a final resolution drafted by the Legal Working Group and containing the consensus views of steering committee members. Though the recommendations vary in specificity and subject area, a few themes are clear. In order to move forward regionally, local stakeholders need to maintain, institutionalize and build relationships with each other in order to facilitate effective collaboration and information sharing. Institutionalizing these relationships and partnerships is key, as people shift positions throughout their careers. Additionally, while more data is needed, the methods by which that data is integrated and shared are equally important. Further, some form of the Whole of Government and Community approach that focuses on the watershed as opposed to jurisdictional boundaries is essential to accomplishing the recommendations set forth in this report.

The IPP has been a success because of the dedicated volunteers committed to a resilient Hampton Roads. During the last two years, this project advanced regional adaptation through the evaluation and recommendation of a future governance structure, the development of working group and committee recommendations, building public awareness, building awareness of the need for federal agency involvement locally and building relationships among numerous organizations involved in the Pilot Project. All of this work, which in pieces may be specific only to a unique circumstance or area, when taken as a whole, brings foundational change. It builds on previous work accomplished by other leaders in the Hampton Roads region and should be leveraged in the future to accelerate regional adaptation.

Click here for the full report.

Resilient Virginia News: November 2017

Resilient Virginia

What’s New

2017 National Climate Assessment, COP 23, and Stateside Commitments

Climate Science Special ReportNational Climate Assessment

The 2017 National Climate Assessment (NCA) Climate Science Special Report (Volume 1) was released on November 3. The National Climate Assessment summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, now and in the future.

A team of more than 300 experts guided by a 60-member Federal Advisory Committee produced the report, which was extensively reviewed by the public and experts, including federal agencies and a panel of the National Academy of Sciences. Volume II, Climate Change Impacts, Risks, and Adaptation in the United States (NCA4 Vol. II), will be published in early 2018.

The U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) was mandated by Congress in the Global Change Research Act (GCRA) of 1990. Its mandate is to develop and coordinate “a comprehensive and integrated United States research program which will assist the Nation and the world to understand, assess, predict, and respond to human-induced and natural processes of global change.”

droughtEvery four years a new report, developed through extensive input from the latest scientific research, is published and submitted to the President and Congress and to the public. This report assesses the effects of global climate change, both human-induced and natural, on the natural environment, agriculture, energy production and use, land and water resources, transportation, human health and welfare, human social systems, and biological diversity.

A summary of the findings include the following:

  • The report confirms the well-established science behind climate change: it is real, it is human-caused, it is happening faster than predicted, and it poses a tremendous threat to America and the rest of the world.
  • Warming graphThis is now the warmest period in the history of modern civilization. Global annually averaged surface air temperature, and the annually averaged temperature in the U.S., has increased by about 1.8 degrees F (1 degree C) over the last 115 years (1901–2016), with Alaska warming twice as much. Last year was the third year in a row, following 2015 and 2014, to set a new global record for the warmest year. (Click graph for larger image: The last five decades have seen a progressive rise in the Earth’s average surface temperature. Bars show the difference between each decade’s average temperature and the overall average for 1901-2000. (Figure source: NOAA NCDC).)
  • Based on extensive evidence, there is no convincing alternative explanation that anything other than human activity is the dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th Century. The global warming of the past 50 years is primarily due to human activities, predominantly the burning of fossil fuels.
  • Global atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations have now passed 400 parts per million (ppm), a level that last occurred about 3 million years ago, when both global average temperature and sea level were significantly higher than today. Continued growth in these emissions over this century and beyond would lead to an atmospheric concentration not experienced in tens to hundreds of millions of years.
  • floodingHuman-caused climate change has made a substantial contribution to the observed 7–8 inches of global average sea level rise since 1900, the greatest rate of rise in at least 2,800 years. Global average sea level is expected to continue to rise by at least several inches in the next 15 years, and by 1–4 feet by 2100. A rise of as much as 8 feet by 2100 cannot be ruled out.
  • The report also focuses on regions within the US and for the Southeast region, and details the following threats: 1) Sea level rise poses widespread and continuing threats to the region’s economy and environment. 2) Extreme heat will affect health, energy, agriculture, and more. 3) Decreased water availability will have economic and environmental impact.

(Source: World Resources Institute, 11/7/2017)

United Nations COP23 Meeting

The United Nations Climate Change Conference, the 23rd annual “Conference of Parties” (or COP23) took place in Bonn, Germany, November 6–17, 2017. A brief summary at the closing of the meetings indicates that:

1. The 195 countries signing the Paris Agreement remain committed to a collective framework on international climate action. Nicaragua and Syria, the only two countries that had not signed the original Paris Agreement in 2015, indicated their support, while the U.S. government indicated it might consider re-commitment at a later date.

2. The international community has yet to send a strong signal that it is committed to transitioning away from fossil fuels. However, an alliance of 19 countries, headed by the United Kingdom (UK) and Canada, committed to phase-out coal production. In the UK, electricity produced by coal has fallen from 40 percent to 2 percent since 2012.

3. Little progress was made defining specific emissions-cutting guidelines. Activists call for a “robust set of rules,” but that rulebook remains woefully thin. A U.S. government presentation about the necessity of fossil fuels sparked one of the conference’s biggest protests.

(Source: Environmental Health News, November 18, 2017)

America's Pledge reportStateside Commitments

On November 11, 2017, the COP 23 Special Advisor for States and Regions California Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. and Michael R. Bloomberg, the United Nations Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Cities and Climate Change, released the America’s Pledge report at the U.S. Climate Action Pavilion, a purpose-built exhibition space sponsored by U.S. non-federal leaders at the COP23 meeting.

The report is the first communication to the international community specifically addressing the scope and scale of non-federal climate action in the United States following the Trump administration’s decision to withdraw from the Paris Agreement. It captures and quantifies the outpouring of public support for the agreement since the withdrawal announcement, finding that cities, states, and businesses representing more than half the U.S. economy and population have declared their support for the Paris Agreement, including more than 2,300 signatories to the “We Are Still In” declaration.

America's PledgeA total of 20 U.S. states, 110 U.S. cities, and over 1,400 businesses with U.S. operations representing USD $25 trillion in market capitalization and nearly 1.0 gigatons of GHG emissions per year have adopted quantified emissions reduction targets.

“The group of American cities, states, and businesses who remain committed to the Paris Agreement represents a bigger economy than any nation outside the U.S. and China,” said Bloomberg. “Together they are helping deliver on the promise of the agreement and ensuring the U.S. remains a global leader in the fight against climate change.” (Source: Press Release, America’s Pledge, 11/11/2017)

Climate Change in the American MindAnd finally, the latest survey from George Mason University’s Center for Climate Communication reveals that the number of Americans “very worried” about global warming has reached a record high since first measured in 2008. A majority of Americans (63%) say they are “very” or “somewhat” worried about the issue. Likewise, Americans increasingly view global warming as a threat. Since Spring 2015, more Americans think it will harm them personally, their own family, people in the U.S., people in developing countries, and future generations. You can read the full survey report here.

Note: Find out more about the NCA report and COP23 at the November 30 Webinar: The Fourth National Climate Assessment and Outcomes from the UN Climate Change Conference in Bonn — COP 23. 1:15–2:45 pm EST. Register at securityandsustainabilityforum.org.


New Videos: You’ll Want to See These Microgrid Presentations

microgrids event oct 2017Resilient Virginia teamed with Leaders In Energy on October 19, 2017, to bring together an exceptional group of national and regional speakers on microgrids, with emphasis on this distributed energy technology as a means to significantly increase energy resiliency.

This evening event, attended by over 100 people, featured speakers from the US Department of Energy, the military, Edison Electric Institute, USGBC’s PEER certification program, and regional microgrid projects.

We are pleased to be able to share with readers the following video presentations in order of appearance:

National Perspective
John Caldwell, Director of Economics, Edison Electric Institute
J.E. Surash, P.E., Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Energy and Sustainability
Robert Hughes, Executive Director of the Office of Energy Assurance, U.S. Air Force
Dan Ton, Program Manager for Smart Grid R&D, U.S. Department of Energy

Regional Market Development
Michael Yambrach, Capital Projects Manager, Montgomery County
Bracken Hendricks, CEO and Founder, Urban Ingenuity, LLC
Brendan Owens, Chief of Engineering, PEER, U.S. Green Building Council

You can also read an in-depth review of the presentations provided by Leaders in Energy.

Above:Janine Finnell, Executive Director of Leaders in Energy, opens an event on microgrids opens an event on microgrids in this video from October 19, 2017. Other presentations from this event are available here.


Four Generations of Leaders in Clean Energy & Sustainable Solutions Awards and Holiday EventThe Urgency of Now: A Timely Event Honoring Cross-Generational Sustainability

Resilient Virginia is helping to promote a timely event — Leaders in Energy’s 4th Annual “Four Generations of Leaders in Clean Energy & Sustainable Solutions Awards and Holiday Event” on December 1, 2017, 6:00–9:00 pm. The event will recognize people across four generations who are raising awareness and developing clean energy and sustainable solutions, with a visible sense of urgency.

This year there will also be a Lifetime Achievement Award given to S. David Freeman, eco-pioneer and author. Freeman has provided progressive leadership to major public utilities coast to coast. Under President Jimmy Carter, he shaped an efficiency-based energy policy as head of the Tennessee Valley Authority. His most recent books include “All Electric America: A Climate Solution and the Hopeful Future.”


On November 28 you can be part of a national movement to celebrate giving to worthwhile causes.

Support our work to make your community more resilient!

Resiliency has many meanings:

  • being prepared for a storm that might damage your house,
  • bringing new businesses to your community,
  • making sure your family has access to healthy food,
  • preparing for flooding from hurricanes and high tides,
  • keeping the lights and heat on in your home or business,
  • having safe drinking water free from harmful substances,
  • protecting your trees and other natural resources,
  • buying fresh produce from local farmers,
  • supporting cleaner energy sources for your home and car.

Resilient Virginia  supports community resiliency by giving you the resources to move ahead with being more prepared for the future. Support our organization on #Giving Tuesday and help us continue to Inform, Educate, and Activate!


Thanks to Our 2017 Annual Sponsors


Platinum Sponsor

logo-marionenterprisesCommunity Leader Sponsor

logo-facility-engineering-assoc
Lifeboat Sponsors

logo_Dewberry_largeHazen and Sawyer
Village Sponsor

logo-leaders-in-energy


Resilience Events Calendar

Fall 2017 Event Highlights

Check our Resilient Events Calendar on a regular basis to find out what is happening in Virginia, around the nation, and virtually through webinars.


Membership — Always in Season!

Resilient Virginia is on a mission to

*Inform   *Educate   and   *Activate

Virginia communities to build resiliency in the face of challenges to community prosperity, national security, and changing climate.

You can help by:

Becoming a Member
Signing on as an Annual Sponsor

Do you shop online? Sign up for one or both of these online shopping sites that contribute to Resilient Virginia:

amazon-smile

goodshop

JOIN TODAY — IT’S OUR FUTURE!

Climate Change in the American Mind

Climate Change in the American MindThe latest survey from George Mason University’s Center for Climate Communication reveals that the number of Americans “very worried” about global warming has reached a record high since first measured in 2008.

A majority of Americans (63%) say they are “very” or “somewhat” worried about the issue. Likewise, Americans increasingly view global warming as a threat. Since Spring 2015, more Americans think it will harm them personally, their own family, people in the U.S., people in developing countries, and future generations.

You can read the full survey report here.

Resilient Virginia News: October 2017

Resilient Virginia

What’s New

Improving Resiliency Through Microgrids and Storage SolutionsImproving Resiliency Through Microgrids and Storage Solutions: October 19, 5:30–6:30pm

Resilient Virginia is partnering again this October with Leaders in Energy to bring together an exceptional group of national and regional speakers on microgrids and storage solutions as a means to significantly increase energy resiliency. Especially in the wake of this year’s severe hurricanes, the utilization of microgrids plus battery storage is seen increasingly by public and private organizations as the wave of the future to help ensure energy reliability.

This event, which will take place at the Edison Electric Institute, will provide participants with the opportunity to meet leaders who are considering and implementing microgrid or battery storage in the Washington DC region. In addition, several speakers will provide a national perspective on the utility-microgrid interface and federal R&D programs.

Confirmed speakers for this event are:

Dr. John Caldwell, Director of Economics, Edison Electric Institute, who heads its Microgrid Task Force, will discuss the utility/microgrid interface. The EEI Microgrid Task Force was formed to support the industry’s advocacy effort for policies that support utility involvement in the construction, owning, and operating of microgrids.

Dan Ton, Program Manager, Smart Grid R&D, US Department of Energy, will present an overview of national research and development initiatives. The US DOE recently awarded $32 million in research funds for ”resilient distribution systems,” including $12 million for two microgrid projects.

Brendan Owens, Chief of Engineering, US Green Building Council, will highlight the Performance Excellence in Electricity Renewal (PEER), the first certification system for sustainable power systems such as microgrids. PEER has been utilized locally to help assess feasibility of a microgrid expansion project at Gallaudet University.

Michael Yambrach, Capital Projects Manager, Montgomery County, will provide a regional example of innovation in the use of microgrids to increase resiliency in critical facilities, and in the development of “Microgrids as a Service,” which has established a structure for costs, construction, and management of systems to be carried out by the private partners.

Bracken Hendricks, CEO and Founder, Urban Ingenuity, leads the implementation of the company’s vision: to finance and develop advanced energy infrastructure projects that speed the clean energy future. UI served as the lead energy development partner in the design of a state-of-the-art district energy system and advanced microgrid at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center.

Join businesses, university and government representatives to learn more about the potential for microgrid utilization in the DMV region. Register at lercpa.org/microgrids by October 12 for the early registration rate.


Virginia’s Clean Power PlanVirginia’s Clean Power Plan — Get Info at October Meetings

In the wake of just-announced steps by the federal government to repeal the Clean Power Plan, Virginia citizens have the opportunity to help ensure that the Virginia Clean Power Plan is successfully implemented. The Virginia League of Conservation Voters Education Fund and other environmental advocacy organizations are hosting a series of meeting during October that provide Virginia citizens the chance to learn more about this plan, how the new regulations will affect the state, and how citizens can help ensure that the program moves forward. Dates and locations — starting October 19 in Charlottesville are detailed in this flyer.

In May 2017, Governor McAuliffe issued Executive Directive 11 — also known as the Clean Energy Virginia initiative — which directed the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality to draft proposed regulations to reduce carbon pollution from stationary sources. Governor McAuliffe’s goal is to work toward reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the Commonwealth’s power plants and to spur the development of new, clean energy jobs. By setting this limit, Governor McAuliffe made Virginia the first southern state to directly address climate change. Over the course of 2017, DEQ has been drafting the proposed regulations and will present them to the State Air Pollution Control Board for review and approval. This vote will happen in mid-November.

Join other community members during October to hear more about the Clean Energy Virginia Initiative, how mitigation of carbon emissions will assist in reducing the impacts from climate change, and how Virginians can continue to move forward in creating clean energy jobs.


GreenBuild 2017USGBC to Address Community Resiliency at GreenBuild 2017

Resilient Virginia is a partner this year with USGBC’s Communities & Affordable Homes Summit at Greenbuild 2017 on Tuesday, November 7 from 9:00 am–5:30 pm in Boston.

The Summit will focus on the development of vibrant, sustainable communities through the lenses of resilience, social equity, health, and economic opportunity. Join the U.S. Green Building Council community of sustainability leaders, environmental justice, and health advocates for information-sharing and problem-solving with the goal of expediting the economic, social, and ecological health and vitality of all communities. This event will focus on the convergence of community sustainability through the lens of:

  • Resilient and healthy community design, planning, and preparedness
  • Financing strategies that result in vibrant local economies
  • Affordable housing development
  • Community engagement and access to resources
  • Equitable development

This year, the Summit will be a call to action — and the participants will be part of creating that action plan for USGBC and its partners to advance equity in green building over the coming year. Two separate tracks will feature some of the leaders at the forefront of community development, environmental justice, and sustainability. The first track highlights successful case studies, discusses practical tools, and provides application techniques for success. The second track brings people and partners together to co-create an action plan to advance equity and sustainability in our buildings and communities. Multi-disciplinary leaders will facilitate small group dialogue, knowledge-sharing, and problem-solving with the singular goal of expediting the economic, social, and ecological health of underserved communities locally, regionally, and globally.

Now is the time for concerted, meaningful, and immediate action to advance a green social justice agenda. Join the dialogue and register today!


Resilient Virginia Conference 2017 Resources AvailableResilient Virginia Conference 2017 Resources Available

Resilient Virginia is pleased to report very positive feedback from our post-conference survey, with close to 90% of the respondents giving the 2017 Resilient Virginia Conference positive reviews. Conference attendees provided ideas for making this type of event even more worthwhile, which included more information on planning for resilience, technical solutions, and financing, and more time with exhibitors and for networking. For the next conference, a wide range of suggestions were provided, including: 1) hearing from the new governor on his resiliency and sustainability programs, 2) offering regional roundtables to spur state-wide resiliency initiatives, and 3) presentations on what role resiliency will have in recovery efforts from the severe hurricanes of 2017.

Resources that are now available to conference attendees and newsletter readers include:

Resilient Virginia would like to again thank Brian Moran, Secretary of Public Safety and Homeland Security; Virginia Department of Emergency Management; Dominion Energy; and all our additional sponsors who made the conference possible, as well as the Conference Planning Committee for their efforts in assembling world-class sessions and speakers.


Thanks to Our 2017 Annual Sponsors


Platinum Sponsor

logo-marionenterprisesCommunity Leader Sponsor

logo-facility-engineering-assoc
Lifeboat Sponsors

logo_Dewberry_largeHazen and Sawyer
Village Sponsor

logo-leaders-in-energy


Resilience Events Calendar

Fall 2017 Event Highlights

  • October 14: Virginia Solar Congress, Location: James Madison University
  • October 19: Improving Resilience through Microgrids and Battery Storage
  • October 24: Webinar: Climate Change, Education, and Democracy
  • October 27: Virginia Coastal Policy Center’s 5th Annual Conference: Defending Our Coasts

Check our Resilient Events Calendar on a regular basis to find out what is happening in Virginia, around the nation, and virtually through webinars.


Membership — Always in Season!

Resilient Virginia is on a mission to

*Inform   *Educate   and   *Activate

Virginia communities to build resiliency in the face of challenges to community prosperity, national security, and changing climate.

You can help by:

Becoming a Member
Signing on as an Annual Sponsor

Thank you to our recent new and renewing members!

Allen Asbury, Smyth County Public Schools
Daniel Bradway
Julie Shortridge, VA Tech
Kathryn Miller
Doug Hendren, MD
Avis Renshaw
James Keck, VCU

Do you shop online? Sign up for one or both of these online shopping sites that contribute to Resilient Virginia:

amazon-smile

goodshop


JOIN TODAY — IT’S OUR
FUTURE!

Resilient Virginia News: August 2017

Resilient Virginia

What’s New

Bring Your Family to the Free Richmond PrepareAthon! August 26, 11AM–4PM

PrepareAthon 2017Celebrate preparedness during the 2017 PrepareAthon, a free festival at the Science Museum of Virginia in Richmond, that teaches the community how to be more resilient when disaster strikes! Uncover life-saving information to protect your family during an emergency and learn more about resiliency. Discover the impacts of climate change on human health, the environment, and the Chesapeake Bay.

Resilient Virginia will participate with this program again this year, as well as other organizations working in resiliency and public safety areas. There will also be resiliency-themed climate change activities in the Museum, including NOAA Science on a Sphere® demonstrations and hands-on experiments in the Eco Lab.

Science Museum of VirginiaDisaster Preparedness Workshops will take place several times during the day, and participants will take home a free Preparedness Kit, valued at $45. The event also features a Rain Barrel Workshop where families can learn about water conservation and how stormwater impacts our waterways. Register for the workshops here.

You can also hear introductory remarks by Congressman A. Donald McEachin, VA-04, and Alicia Zatcoff, City of Richmond Sustainability Director; and presentations on “Human Health Impacts of Climate Change,” by Matthew Burke, M.D., Director of State Programs, Medical Society Consortium on Climate Change and Health, and “Summer in the City—Richmond’s Urban Heat Islands,” by Jeremy Hoffman, Ph.D., Climate and Earth Science Specialist, Science Museum of Virginia.

For the full program, visit the Science Museum of Virginia website.

The 2017 PrepareAthon is hosted by Science Museum of Virginia under award #NA15SEC0080009 from the Environmental Literacy Grant (ELG) program of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), U.S. Department of Commerce. Statements, findings, conclusions, and recommendations are those of the Museum and do not necessarily reflect views of NOAA or U.S. Department of Commerce.


Governor McAuliffe’s Remarks at the 2017 Resilient Virginia Conference

We are pleased that Governor Terry McAuliffe provided introductory remarks at the August 1–2 Resilient Virginia Conference this year. You can view his videotaped statement here.

Led by Secretary of Public Safety and Homeland Security Brian Moran, our Day One Plenary Session speakers addressed resiliency perspectives from the national level as well as sharing lessons learned from Louisiana and Colorado, and the City of Richmond. The Lunch Plenary Panel provided insights into the economic value to both governments and corporations of adopting resiliency in policies and operations.

Day Two Plenary Session speakers provided highlights of the 100 Resilient Cities Planning Process and the NIST Community Resilience Planning Guide, and the final Lunchtime Plenary Panel included state elected officials who shared their thoughts on moving Virginia forward toward a comprehensive resiliency plan.

We will be sharing these thoughtful presentations, as well as Breakout Session content, with you on our website by early September.

Secretary Moran provided his own summary of why resiliency needs to be addressed in a collaborative fashion, in forums such as the Resilient Virginia Conference, when he observed that “Resilience ultimately is our ability to keep our fundamental resources — water, air, land, and critical infrastructure — safe and usable for our communities, for generations to come.”

We thank Secretary Brian Moran, the Virginia Department of Emergency Management, Dominion Energy, and all our Sponsors, Exhibitors, Partners, and Planning Committee Members for working to make the 2017 Resilient Virginia Conference a memorable event.


Thanks to Our 2017 Annual Sponsors


Platinum Sponsor

logo-marionenterprisesCommunity Leader Sponsor

logo-facility-engineering-assoc
Lifeboat Sponsors

logo_Dewberry_largeHazen and Sawyer
Village Sponsor

logo-leaders-in-energy


Resilience Events Calendar

Fall 2017 Event Highlights

  • September 21 Webinar: Making a Big Impact in Sustainability Science with Big Data
  • October 5: Virginia Urban Agriculture Conference
  • October 14: Virginia Solar Congress

Check our Resilient Events Calendar on a regular basis to find out what is happening in Virginia, around the nation, and virtually through webinars.


Membership Brings Extra Benefits This Summer!

Resilient Virginia is on a mission to

*Inform   *Educate   and   *Activate

Virginia communities to build resiliency in the face of challenges to community prosperity, national security, and changing climate.

You can help by:

Becoming a Member
Signing on as an Annual Sponsor

Resilient Virginia will help you deal with the summer heat by sharing a gift certificate from this Virginia business when you become a member through September 2017.

logo-moothru

Located in Remington, Virginia

Do you shop online? Sign up for one or both of these online shopping sites that contribute to Resilient Virginia:

amazon-smile

goodshop


JOIN TODAY — IT’S OUR
FUTURE!

2017 Resilient Virginia Conference Delivers on its Promise to Connect Communities, Businesses, and Educators for Resiliency Solutions

Aug. 1-2: Resilient Virginia ConferenceFor the second year, our Resilient Virginia Conference was a great success, bringing together state, local, and national leaders to share know-how and inspire further efforts toward local resiliency actions. Conference participants shared these comments:

“Amazing to see such a gathering in Virginia!”

“Well worth attending for the diverse topics, people, and interactions!”

“A truly fantastic event!”

We are pleased that Governor Terry McAuliffe kicked off the event with a statement about the importance of holding the second Resilient Virginia Conference. You can view his statement here.

You will also be able to revisit the insights provided by national and state-level experts in the Plenary Sessions, as we will be including their presentations on our website in video format. Led by Secretary of Public Safety and Homeland Security Brian Moran, conference speakers addressed resiliency perspectives from the national level as well as sharing lessons learned from Louisiana and Colorado. The Lunch Plenary Panel provided insights into the economic value to both governments and corporations of adopting resiliency in policies and operations. In addition, Day Two Plenary Session speakers provided highlights of the 100 Resilient Cities Planning Process and the NIST Community Resilience Planning Guide, and the final Lunchtime Plenary Panel included state elected officials who shared their thoughts on moving Virginia forward toward a comprehensive resiliency plan.

We will also be sharing the Breakout Session presentations that included a wide range of topics, which can be reviewed on the conference website.

Secretary Moran provided his own summary of why resiliency needs to be addressed in a collaborative fashion, in forums such as the Resilient Virginia Conference, when he observed that “Resilience ultimately is our ability to keep our fundamental resources — water, air, land, and critical infrastructure — safe and usable for our communities, for generations to come.”

We thank Secretary Moran, the Virginia Department of Emergency Management, Dominion Energy, and all our Sponsors, Exhibitors, Partners, and Planning Committee Members for working to make the 2017 Resilient Virginia Conference a memorable event.

Annette Osso, Managing Director, Resilient Virginia

August 2017

Celebrate Preparedness During PrepareAthon: August 26

PreparaThon: August 26

Celebrate preparedness during PrepareAthon on August 26, 11am to 4pm, at the Science Museum of Virginia!

Celebrate preparedness during PrepareAthon, a free festival that teaches the community how to be more resilient when disaster strikes! Uncover life-saving information to protect your family during an emergency and learn more about resiliency. Local experts will discuss the impacts of climate change on human health, the environment and the Chesapeake Bay.

Enjoy resiliency-themed climate change activities in the Museum, including NOAA Science on a Sphere® demonstrations, hands-on experiments in Eco Lab and beyond. Build your own solitary bee nest, make your own water filter and check out a bicycle-powered blender that makes delicious smoothies!

Register here for a Disaster Preparedness Workshop and come away with a free Preparedness Kit, valued at $45, and meet with local experts to discuss safety preparedness. Or register here for a free Rain Barrel Workshop, limited to one per family, and learn about water conservation and how stormwater impacts our waterways.

Science Museum of VirginiaPrepareAthon is hosted by Science Museum of Virginia under award # NA15SEC0080009 from the Environmental Literacy Grant (ELG) program of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), US Department of Commerce. Statements, findings, conclusions, and recommendations are those of the Museum and do not necessarily reflect views of NOAA or US Department of Commerce.

When: Saturday, August 26 from 11 am to 4 pm
Where: Science Museum of Virginia
2500 West Broad Street
Richmond, VA 23220-2057

Visit: http://www.smv.org/upcoming-events/prepareathon

Resilient Virginia Provides Local Governments Guide to Resiliency Planning

In collaboration with GoGreen Virginia, a Virginia Municipal League and Virginia Association of Counties program, Resilient Virginia is offering a guide to resiliency planning — the Resiliency Checklist. Formulated to add credits to the annual Green Government Challenge, the guide can also be utilized separately by local governments wanted a starting point to tackle comprehensive mitigation and adaptation approaches to disasters, climate extremes, and other risks faced by communities.

Resilient Virginia plans to work with Planning District Commissions to develop workshops around this guide to assist local governments in gaining the competency to move forward in resiliency planning. You can review an brief presentation on the Resiliency Checklist from the Resilient Virginia Conference here and the entire document here.

Resiliency Checklist
Click to view the Resiliency Checklist presentation

Resilient Virginia News: May 2017

Resilient Virginia

What’s New

2017 Resilient Virginia ConferenceJoin Resiliency Innovators at the Resilient Virginia Conference, August 1–2, 2017

Registration is open for the 2017 Resilient Virginia Conference, taking place August 1–2 at the Richmond Convention Center. This year, Resilient Virginia is pleased that the Virginia Secretary of Public Safety and Homeland Security and Chief Resiliency Officer and the Virginia Department of Emergency Management (VDEM), is taking a leading role in supporting the conference.

Our focus, Connecting Communities, Business, and Educators for Resiliency Solutions, will bring together participants from local and state governments, the business community, and representatives from higher education and community organizations to:

Connect with resiliency planning experts from Virginia and other states who are proactively addressing climate and national security risks in their regions;

Gain information on new products and technologies that target concerns about extreme weather events, energy security, and long-term adaptation to deal with sea level rise and flooding;

Learn about and take away tools that can be used for resiliency planning in their own communities

Our distinguished speakers at the August 1–2, 2017 Resilient Virginia Conference include:

State Resiliency Programs

The Honorable Brian Moran, Secretary of Public Safety and Homeland Security, Commonwealth of Virginia

Emergency Management and Hazard Mitigation

Rob Mooney, Protective Security Advisor, Office of Infrastructure Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security
Stacie Neal, Critical Infrastructure Program Manager, Office of the Secretary of Public Safety and Homeland Security
Pete Owens, Protective Security Advisor, Office of Infrastructure Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security
Ed Porner, Director, Recovery and Resilience Division, Virginia Department of Emergency Management
James Riddick, Director, Norfolk Office of Emergency Preparedness and Response

Business Resiliency

George B. Huff, Jr., CBCP, MBCI, Director of Consulting, The Continuity Project
Maureen Roskoski, LEED AP O+M, SFP, Corporate Sustainability Officer, Facility Engineering Associates, P.C.
Philip Schneider, AIA, Director, Multihazard Mitigation Council, National Institute of Building Sciences

Rural/Agricultural Challenges

Evan Fineman, Executive Director, Tobacco Region Revitalization Commission
Rebecca Joyce, Senior Planner, Central Shenandoah Planning District Commission
Julie Shortridge, Ph.D., Assistant Professor and Outreach Specialist, Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Virginia Tech
Andy Sorrell, AICP, Coordinator, Farmland Preservation, VDACS

Innovative Technologies and Solutions

Carol Considine, M.S., Engineering Technology, Old Dominion University
Christina Luman-Bailey, Vice Mayor, City of Hopewell and Chairperson, GoGreen Virginia
Greg Mella, FAIA, LEED AP BD+C, SmithGroup, JJR
Aaron Sutch, Program Director, VA SUN
Matt Wade, Deputy Director, VA Clean Cities

Resiliency Planning

Stephen Cauffman, Lead, Disaster Resilience, National Institute of Standards and Technology
Nancy McNabb, AIA, The Continuity Project
Henry “Speaker” Pollard, Partner, Williams Mullen
David Savarese, Consultant, Jacobs
Sirirat Tavanapong, Director, Advance Planning Group, Jacobs

Visit the conference website for updates on the agenda topics and speakers.

Plan to participate by attending, sponsoring, or exhibiting at the conference. Join your colleagues in working toward a resilient future! Register today at our conference website.


Thanks to Our 2017 Resilient Virginia Conference Sponsors!

Virginia Department of Emergency Management

Dominion Energy

Facility Engineering Associates

Virginia Department of Environmental Quality

And additional sponsors

For information on sponsorship opportunities for the 2017 Resilient Virginia Conference, contact Annette Osso, Managing Director, Resilient Virginia(osso@resilientvirginia.org).

Thanks to Our 2016 and 2017 Annual Sponsors


Platinum Sponsor

logo-marionenterprisesCommunity Leader Sponsor

logo-facility-engineering-assoc
Lifeboat Sponsors

logo_Dewberry_largeHazen and Sawyer
Village Sponsors

logo-get_ready

logo-leaders-in-energy


Resilience Events Calendar

Highlights for May 2017 and Beyond!!

Check our Resilient Events Calendar on a regular basis to find out what is happening in Virginia, around the nation, and virtually through webinars.

Membership Brings Extra Benefits This Summer!

Resilient Virginia is on a mission to

*Inform   *Educate   and   *Activate

Virginia communities to build resiliency in the face of challenges to community prosperity, national security, and changing climate.

You can help by:

Becoming a Member
Signing on as an Annual Sponsor

Since Summer is almost here, Resilient Virginia will send you a gift certificate from this Virginia business when you become a member.

logo-moothru

Located in Remington, Virginia

Thanks to our recent new and renewing members!

Kevin Chisholm
Katherine O’Neill, Roanoke College
Alyson Jordan Tomaszewski
Pamela Vosburgh
Karen Warren, Randolph College

Do you shop online? Sign up for one or both of these online shopping sites that contribute to Resilient Virginia:

amazon-smile

goodshop


JOIN TODAY — IT’S OUR
FUTURE!

Costs of Doing Nothing: Economic Consequences of Not Adapting to Sea Level Rise in the Hampton Roads Region

Costs of Doing NothingRecent studies have pointed out the economic costs of rising temperatures, increased sea levels, and extreme weather events — all factors associated with climate change impact in the Southeast United States.

Costs of Doing Nothing: Economic Consequences of Not Adapting to Sea Level Rise in the Hampton Roads Region, a 2016 report from Virginia Coastal Policy Center, College of William & Mary Law School, narrows down the data to the Hampton Roads area. This report looks at several scenarios for sea level rise and the economic consequences.

Read more

1 2 3 4 8